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Weight Loss Product Warnings — How to Spot Bad Pills

There are numerous ways to make a bad weight loss product look good. How to Spot Bad Pills is the first article in a series on evaluating weight loss products. My hope is to provide you with reliable, easy to understand, and useful tips for spotting bad weight loss products.

For the purpose of this article, the phrase, weight loss pill, refers to over-the-counter, non-prescription weight loss supplements. The following six tips will help you identify weight loss pills that don’t back up claims with evidence, cite poorly designed research studies, don’t work, and possibly cause serious harm.

The tips, arranged in no particular order, are effective in spotting glaring omissions of evidence, misrepresentations, and outright lies. However, many marketers have become quite skilled in the art of statistical illusion, fooling even those of us with extensive experience in statistical analysis.

What does this mean for you? Use the six tips from How to Spot a Bad Pill as part of your own overall assessment and not as a definitive evaluation. A “good” weight loss pill based upon my six tips, does not necessarily translate to a well studied, safe, and effective product. However, a bad pill here is a bad pill everywhere.

With that quick disclaimer, let’s get started…

Bad Pill Tip #1 — References

Match each claim cited with a reference. The reference should be clear and include the author’s name, the location of the study, primary sponsor, title of study, publication source, year, volume, and pages.

A solid claim made for a weight loss pill should not be sales oriented. I fully understand that there is a time to sell. However, I am assuming you are beyond that, and need real information about this weight loss product in question. As you investigate the pill, and the sales copy never seems to go way, that’s a red flag.

Lets look at two different claims. The first one is NOT a solid science claim…”Amazing New Weight Loss Pill Maximizes Weight Loss…”. This belongs back in the sales copy.

Instead, here is a claim¬† Sex pills for men¬†well grounded in science…

“The percentage of weight loss was significantly higher in the test group at the end of the 5 week study…(6)”

Notice the reference is clearly cited and displayed by the number 6. This is identifying the 6th listing on the reference page as the source. This brings up a related topic about the reference page. All ads and websites should have a reference page.

 

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