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The Three Top ADHD Medication Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them

One of the most effective management strategies for minimizing the challenges and symptoms of ADHD is medication. This might not be the most popular statement I have ever made, but research over and over again has shown that ADHD medications can “level the playing field” for adults with ADHD. Medications can be effective in helping adults with ADHD increase their focus on less interesting tasks, reduce impulsivity of actions and words and calm inner restlessness. I often hear clients describe the experience of being on the right medication as similar to having “the fog clearing”, “the water globe settling” or a “light switch being turned on”. They feel more focused, energetic, calm and productive. However, many adults never have the chance to experience the full benefits of ADHD medication due to three problem areas that I call “ADHD medication pitfalls”…taking the wrong medication, the wrong dose or taking medications at the wrong time.

“Medication Pitfall” #1

The first of these ADHD medication “pitfalls” is that many Adults with ADHD are not on the right medication. For good or bad, there is not a lot of variety in medications used to manage ADHD. In fact there are really only three. The good news is that with such limited options these medications have been studied over and over again for the past 50 years and we know the long term effects. The bad, is that there is a very limited choice of medications when it comes to treating the core ADHD symptoms.

ADHD medications can be divided into three categories: 1) Stimulants, 2) non-stimulants, and 3) “other”. Even though stimulants tend to be the most effective in decreasing the key symptoms of ADHD in adults, many people tend to avoid these due to real or feared side effects of the ADHD medication. Medications in this category include: Ritalin, Adderall, Dexedrine, Vyvanse, Concerta, etc. These medications are designed to “stimulate” the dopamine neurotransmitters of the brain; the key neurotransmitter that seems to be functioning ineffectively or in insufficient amounts in the brains of people challenged with ADHD. This category of medications is typically very effective in decreasing hyperactivity, distractibility and impulsivity.

 

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